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00:30:00

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San Francisco 7, Us 6, Nancycy Pelosi 2, San Franciscans 2, Deborah 1, Obama 1, Nancy Pelosi 1, Lee 1, Harvey 1, Ha Hha Ha 1, San Francisco Unified 1, Michelle Obama 1, Abel 1, Haa Ha Ha 1, Lauren 1, Willie Brown 1, Barry 1, Texas 1, Healthier City 1, Guadalajara 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    February 5, 2013
    11:00 - 11:30am PST  

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these bullets have no place on our streets. and there's another type of violent crime where often no weapon is involved and that's domestic violence and abuse which effects whoo too many woman and children in our streets. we must prevent and report domestic abuse. i pledge - and i pledge to continue to working on the pleasantly with our partners in the community to bring to issue the violation that will prevent
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woman and children >> i'm also proud that under our probation departments and working with police and other city departments san francisco in 2012 has responded to the challenges a of realignment and intergrating non-violent programs it sport non-violent lives. and just as he must continue to be a healthier city. less than one year our adults will receive health care thanks to president obama and nancycy
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pelosi. we have a long-standing healthy program and the new international law will extend the program to 3 b thousand san franciscans. and just as we must keep getting health care and pension reform define we must address the challenge of the unfunded liability area. we're beginning to make progress but we must development a more responsible approach to
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providing health care to our retired city employees >> and know that together our partners in labor will address this the san francisco way to son sense once in a while. and finally, we must rebuilt our st. louis hospital in the mission. they're the priors of critical health deliver as well as major employers. members of the board have taken a strong leadership role working with my office to bring a proposal back to the community that delivers jobs and most importantly critical health care for our city were we're going to
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get it done. and that brings me arrest warrant why we're here today. a college track and education. i hear from businesses that they're number one priority is education. they would like nothing better to hire san franciscans but they often struggle to find their candidates. and it's clear to me the only way our city will continue to be strong is if we support the improvement of our city schools. in many cities they choose to address the keegs challenges by picking fights and appointing fingers but once again not in 90
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san francisco. together we strive for excellence in our public schools not excused. last year, i met with our community leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development
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are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the
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partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or
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leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we must continue to preserve our colleges decree - it's important to equip our kids to win in the 20th century you knew. i've offered the schools
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leadership to continue to go forward. i want to thank you you for working with the state to put city college back on track and r that keeps the opportunity coming for every san franciscan young person. because hope and opportunity after all are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most
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places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids. we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone
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whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help future generations and thank you
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go
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>> welcome to "culturewire." today we are at recology. they are celebrate 20 years of one of the most incredibly unique artist residency programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's.
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she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the
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program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on work that was done many years ago in new york. it is the only kind of structured, artist program. weit is beautiful.
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a lot of the plants you see were pulled out of the garbage, and we use our compost to transplant them. the pathway is lined with rubble from the earthquake from the freeways we tour about 5000 people a year to our facility, adults and children. we talk about recycling and conservation. they can meet the artists. >> fantastic. let's go meet some of your current artists. here we are with lauren. can you tell us how long have been here so far and what you're working on? >> we started our residency on june 1, so we came into the studio then and spent most of the first couple weeks just digging around in the trash. i am continuing my body of work, kind of making these hand- embroidered objects from our day-to-day life. >> can you describe some of the things you have been making
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here? this is amazing. >> i think i started a lot of my work about the qualities of light is in the weight. i have been thinking a lot about things floating through the air. it is also very windy down here. there is a piece of sheet music up there that i have embroidered third. there is a pamphlet about hearing dea -- nearing death. this is a dead rabbit. this is what i am working on now. this is a greeting card that i found, making it embroidered. it is for a very special friend. >> while we were looking at this, i glanced down and this is amazing, and it is on top of a book, it is ridiculous and amazing. >> i am interested in the serendipity of these still life compositions.
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when he got to the garbage and to see the arrangement of objects that is completely spontaneous. it is probably one of the least thought of compositions. people are getting rid of this stuff. it holds no real value to them, because they're disposing of it. >> we're here in another recology studio with abel. what attracted you to apply for this special program? >> who would not want to come to the dump? but is the first question. for me, being in a situation that you're not comfortable in has always been the best. >> what materials were you immediately attracted to when you started and so what was available here? >> there are a lot of books. that is one of the thing that hits me the most. books are good for understanding, language, and art in general. also being a graphic designer, going straight to the magazines and seeing all this printed material being discarded has also been part of my work.
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of course, always wood or any kind of plastic form or anything like that. >> job mr. some of the pieces you have made while you have been here. -- taught me through some of the pieces you have made while you have been here. >> the first thing that attracted me to this was the printed surface. it was actually a poster. it was a silk screen watercolor, about 8 feet long. in terms of the flatwork, i work with a lot of cloddish. so being able to cut into it come at into it, removed parts, it is part of the process of negotiating the final form. >> how do you jump from the two dimensional work that you create to the three-dimensional? maybe going back from the 3f to 2d. >> everything is in the process of becoming. things are never said or settled. the sculptures are being made
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while i am doing the collages, and vice versa. it becomes a part of something else. there's always this figuring out of where things belong or where they could parapets something else. at the end goal is to possibly see one of these collage plans be built out and create a structure that reflects back into the flat work. >> thank you so much for allowing "culturewire" to visit this amazing facility and to learn more about the artists in residence program. is there anything you like our viewers to know? >> we have art exhibitions every four months, and a win by the public to come out. everybody is welcome to come out. we have food. sometimes we have gains and bands. it is great time. from june to september, we accept applications from bay area artists. we encouraged artists from all mediums to apply. we want as many artists from the bay area out here so they can
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have the same experience. >> how many artists to do your host here? >> 6 artist a year, and we receive about 108 applications. very competitive. >> but everyone should be encouraged to apply. thank you again for hosting us. >> thank you for including us in "culturewire." ♪ ♪
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oh, my! haa ha ha! ha hha ha! [snortg]
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[ applause ] >> okay. good afternoon afternoon. it is my pleasure to welcome you all here on behalf of the board of directors of st. anthony foundation. this is the groundbreaking for our brand-new dining room with mercy housing 90 units of affordable housing for seniors. [applause] [applause] this is one of the finest examples of collaboration in the non-profit sentor sector and i'm proud to be part of it. on behalf of the board of directors of st. anthony foundation, i want to offer our greatest gratitude and appreciation for all your
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help. thank you. [ applause ] >> good afternoon everybody. doug shoemaker the president of mercy housing foundation and this is a fabulous day. it doesn't get more complicated than the scenario we put together here. that is the san francisco way. if you can do it simply, you wouldn't want do it. [ laughter ] >> so we have tried to make it complicated, but the result is going to be an unbelievable, unbelievable community asset really what st. anthony and mercying housing and what all of our partners are about. there are so many people here that one of the things we're going to have to live with today a long list of thanks. not everyone will speak, but i want to acknowledge many of the people who here today. we're blessed to have leader nancy pelosi here. who has been a huge leader. [ applause ]
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mayor lee, and it seems like we might have a quorum with the board of supervisors. i'm sure there is no work getting done over there today because we have been blessed with so many. supervisor kim, supervisor yeee, supervisor cohen and supervisor dufty and those are just too name a few. for mercy, these opportunitis are just few and far between. we were talking earlier, barry and i about how many people st. anthony's sees on a regular basis. these 89 affordable housing units and one manager's unit is an unbelievable accomplishment. and the sad thing it's just a drop in the bucket compared to the need we have. i think all of you know that, ic